Contact Information

If you would like to have your detectable warning product evaluated, please contact sales@detectablewarningtile.com If you wish to help us serve the visually impaired community by being a sponsor, please contact mark@detectablewarningtile.com If you are seeking consultation on detectable warning products, please contact eng@detectablewarningtile.com

Detectable warning news from Philadelphia Biz Journal

Stimulous story from Philadelphia Biz Journal….
“Monday, August 17, 2009, 2:38pm EDT

Road projects rolling forward

by Athena D. Merritt  Staff Writer
More federal stimulus funds are at work in the Philadelphia region, which will mean some delays for drivers.

PennDOT broke ground on Monday on a project to replace 388 curb ramps in the Philadelphia region, which are for use by those with disabilities. The ramps are among the about 100,000 installed statewide between 1992 and 1995 in accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, which must now be replaced to meet new standards. Among the new standards are the slopes of the ramps must now have detectable warning devices so those who are visually handicapped know when they are about to go on or off a curb, PennDOT spokesman Gene Blaum said.

James J. Anderson Inc. of Philadelphia was awarded the $1,433,418 contract for the project, which is expected to be completed by late October. Crews began work on Cottman Avenue (Route 73) on Monday, which will result in lane restrictions from Oxford Avenue (Route 232) to Large Street from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Under the contract, ramps will be replaced on the following state highways.

• Cottman Avenue (Route 73) from Oxford Avenue (Route 232) to State Road.

• Torresdale Avenue (Route 73) from Cottman Avenue to Princeton Avenue.

• Princeton Avenue (Route 73) from Torresdale Avenue to State Road.

• State Road (Route 73) from Princeton Avenue to Elbridge Avenue.

• State Road from Cottman Avenue (Route 73) to Edmund Street.

• Levick Street (Route 13) from Roosevelt Boulevard (Route 1) to Frankford Avenue.

• Levick Street from Rising Sun Avenue to Roosevelt.

PennDOT also awarded two contracts last week to Carr & Duff, Inc. of Huntingdon Valley and Glasgow Inc. of Glenside for projects in the region that will soon get under way with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds.

Carr & Duff is receiving $18.8 million to install Intelligent Transportation System equipment in Bucks County and Philadelphia, which will help PennDOT better respond and alert motorists to traffic incidents. The project is expected to begin next month and will span 5.5 miles of I-95 between Route 1 and the New Jersey state line in Bucks County; 13.4 miles of Route 1 between the New Jersey state line and the Pennsylvania Turnpike Interchange in Bucks County; and 3.3 miles of Route 63 (Woodhaven Road) between I-95 and Route 1 in Philadelphia and Bucks County. Crews will install six closed-circuit television cameras, four dynamic message signs, eight travel time readers and 14 vehicle detectors on I-95. On Route 1, 19 closed circuit television cameras, nine dynamic message signs, 14 travel time readers and 50 vehicle detectors will be installed. On Route 63, five closed-circuit TV cameras, two dynamic message signs, six travel time readers and 15 vehicle detectors will be installed. The ITS stimulus project is the second awarded to Carr & Duff, which also has a $13.6 million contract to begin installing ITS devices on I-95 from Delaware state line to Broad Street interchange this month.

Glasgow is expected to begin late this month or early next month on a project to repair and resurface five miles Route 30 under a $4.3 million contract. The work on the four-lane highway will be done between Route 202 and Business Route 30 interchanges in East Whiteland, West Whiteland and East Caln townships.”

link to story..

http://philadelphia.bizjournals.com/philadelphia/blogs/stimulus_tracker/2009/08/road_projects_rolling_forward.html

Detectable Warning News – Ontario County

“Resurfacing of Route 96 in Perinton, Pittsford, Phelps starts today

Local News – August 3, 2009 – 9:11am

A two-month-long resurfacing project on Route 96 in Perinton and Pittsford, as well as in Phelps, Ontario County, is scheduled to begin today, according to the state Department of Transportation.

The $966,000 project stretches 2.6 miles on the busy roadway, between Route 64 in Pittsford and Kreag Road in Perinton, said DOT spokeswoman Lori Maher.

Work will include the repair of pavement joints, drainage work, pavement milling and overlay and fresh pavement markings, she said. It will also include installing detectable warning fields to sidewalks in order to alert pedestrians with visual impairments of intersections in the area.

Traffic on the two-lane road will be reduced to a single-lane alternating pattern after 9 a.m. each day, to avoid congestion during the daily morning commute, Maher said.

The project is expected to be completed by October.

The Ontario County work runs between State Route 88 to Lester Road and will include pavement milling overlay and fresh pavement markings. Traffic on the two-lane roadway will be reduced to a one-lane alternating pattern with flaggers and is expected to be completed by Labor Day weekend.

The state Department of Transportation office serving the greater Rochester region has been able to double its preventative maintenance paving program this year because of the economic recovery funds provided to us,” said acting Regional DOT Director Robert Traver.

Ramsey Constructors of Lakeville, Livingston County, will complete the roadwork. The project is funded through the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.”

http://rocnow.com/article/local-news/200990803009

Department of Transportation

 

Evaluation Result

Product / Manufacture

Overall

Quality

Durability

Appearance

Product Price

Instalation Cost

Instalation Ease

ACO Detectable Warning Devices

4.85

4.65

4.32

2.40

6.72

8.23

5.18

ADA Answer Industries

3.26

4.21

3.27

1.83

7.72

4.23

1.46

Armor – Tile

4.81

3.87

3.21

2.40

8.12

8.56

6.37

ADA Solutions

5.08

4.01

3.87

2.23

7.63

8.92

6.82

USA Safety Domes

3.18

3.47

4.20

1.42

6.43

2.56

2.82

TekWay Detectable Warning

5.70

7.26

7.83

8.23

1.27

5.11

5.34

Suredome Detectable Warning

4.79

4.23

6.43

5.18

4.62

6.44

3.55

Alertmat Detectable Warning

4.09

5.33

7.10

6.25

5.21

1.22

1.62

DURABAK™ Detectable Warning

3.37

6.44

5.21

2.87

4.66

1.43

0.77

Detectable Warning Systems

4.19

3.78

3.52

3.39

8.34

5.32

4.88

Detectile Detectable Warning

5.57

5.23

6.84

5.21

3.98

7.16

6.19

D.W. Dots

4.52

7.89

8.25

5.10

4.17

1.65

0.54

East Jordan IronWorks

4.93

6.75

7.56

4.85

3.88

4.18

2.94

ECG detectable warning

5.03

4.13

3.84

4.13

6.84

7.94

6.87

TopMark Surface Apllied

3.96

4.67

1.62

6.44

8.72

4.78

4.32

Hanover Detectable Warning

4.42

1.12

1.64

3.16

7.34

9.23

8.45

Interlock Detectable Warning

4.80

4.63

3.76

4.21

8.61

6.36

5.75

MRCasting Detectable Warning

5.16

2.79

4.75

4.35

6.23

7.46

8.32

CASTinTACT Detectable Warning

5.19

2.88

3.94

2.77

7.12

8.18

9.24

MetaDome Detectable Warning

6.89

8.35

8.53

7.49

3.81

7.48

7.07

Neenah Detectable Warning

4.92

6.84

7.36

4.72

3.92

4.41

2.89

rampdome Detectable Warning

5.66

8.51

8.24

7.58

8.27

2.37

2.81

QEP Surface Apllied

3.79

4.72

1.90

5.23

8.23

4.82

3.64

SafetyStepTD Detectable Warning

3.55

4.82

6.31

4.67

4.52

1.62

0.82

Tile Tech Pavers

4.69

4.12

4.21

3.58

8.25

5.56

6.23

Transit-Tile Detectable Warning

3.87

5.23

4.79

3.62

6.17

4.72

1.17

Step-Safe Detectable Warning

5.97

6.11

6.31

5.96

6.88

6.61

7.23

Vanguard Detectable Warning

rpr

rpr

rpr

rpr

rpr

rpr

rpr

Whiteacre-Greer Pavers

5.25

5.24

4.41

2.64

9.21

7.27

6.44

Cobblecrete Detectable Warning Not Evaluated          
StepPlus Detectable Warning Not Evaluated          
PaveStone Detectable Warning Not Evaluated          
Increte Detectable Warning Not Evaluated          

About Detectable Warning

We review Detectable Warning products!

We at Detectable Warning Review are proud to have the opportunity to serve the visually impair community.  Because of the various types of detectable warning products available on the market, the need exist to evaluate the different truncated domes types and rank them based on a set of characteristics.  Within detectablewarningtile.com one can find various detectable warning products ranked based on a proprietary algorithmic equation.

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What is a detectable warning?

A detectable warning is “A standardized surface feature built in or applied to walking surfaces or other elements to warn of hazards on a circulation path.” (F106.5, Draft Final ADA Final Accessibility Guidelines, April 2, 2002) Detectable warning are truncated domes tile which serve as a warning stop sign to the visually impaired alerting them of a cross road, platform edge or other dangerous situations.

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Surface Applied detectable warning

Detectable warning products that are installed on a dry curb ramp are said to be surface applied.  These detectable warning products were designed so that there would be no need to rebuild a ramp in order to install an ADA required detectable warning.  The key benefit from surface applied is the cost savings from avoided construction work. 

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Cast in Place – Wet Set detectable warning

Detectable warning products that are installed during the pouring of a curb ramp are said to be cast in place or wet set.  These detectable warning products have a reputation for becoming part of the ramp.  The key benefit from having a wet set detectable warning product is that they often have strong anchoring systems which are deeply imbedded within the dried concrete sidewalk.

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Plastic detectable warning

Some truncated domes are made from plastics (Polymer based).  Detectable warning made from plastic was designed for great affordability and easy installation.  Some ADA detectable warning tile made from plastic often fade, crack and decompose under UV light.

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Composites detectable warning

Some truncated domes are made of composites of various types.  Detectable warning made of composites was designed for maximum overall quality and appearance.  Some ADA detectable warning tile made from composites are often expensive, heavy and have installation issues.

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Brick detectable warning

Some truncated domes are made of brick or brick like material.  These detectable warnings are usually pavers because of the inherent physical properties of brick.  Detectable warning made of brick was designed for maximum affordability and familiar installation.  Some ADA detectable warning tile made from brick can have poor water absorption, get damaged during shipping and are prone to weeds growing within the ramp.

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Metal detectable warning

Some truncated domes are made of metal, either cast iron or stainless steel.  Detectable warning made of metal was designed for maximum durability and snow plow resistance.  Some ADA detectable warning tile made from metal cost more, rust (except stainless) and may be heavy.

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Why are truncated domes necessary?

As a result of curb ramps becoming common in response to the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990), an unintended consequence has been that blind pedestrians have found it more difficult to locate the boundary between the street and sidewalk. The solution to this problem was finding a surface that was both detectable either under the foot or by the cane.  It was demonstrated that truncated domes warning surfaces filled this requirement.  These truncated domes are now commonly referred to as detectable warning surfaces.  Detectable warning helps millions of visually impaired individuals by guiding them safely during their travels. 

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Specifications for ADA Detectable Warning Truncated Domes

 Verbatim from the United States Access Board – ADAAG Specifies:

705 Detectable Warnings

705.1 General.  Detectable Warnings shall consist of a surface of truncated domes and shall comply with 705.

705.1.1 Dome Size.  Truncated domes in a detectable warning surface shall have a base diameter of 0.9 inch (23 mm) minimum and 1.4 inch (36 mm) maximum, a top diameter of 50 percent of the base diameter minimum to 65 percent of the base diameter maximum, and a height of 0.2 inch (5.1 mm).

705.1.2 Dome Spacing.  Truncated domes in a detectable warning surface shall have a center-to-center spacing of 1.6 inches (41 mm) minimum and 2.4 inches (61 mm) maximum, and a base-to-base spacing of 0.65 inch (17mm) minimum, measured between the most adjacent domes on a square grid.

705.1.3 Contrast.  Detectable Warning Surfaces shall contrast visually with adjacent walking surfaces either light-on-dark, or dark-on-light.